How to Make Sure Your Family Is Prepared for Anything

How to Make Sure Your Family Is Prepared for Anything

Working Parent
Reading Time: 4 minutes



You may not want to think about it, but life throws unexpected events at you all the time. You never know when something could go wrong or an unplanned event could enrich your life. The great part of life is that so many grand things are unexpected and not asked for. But you also have to look out for the bad stuff lurking in the dark corners.

As long as you’re prepared for the inevitable and looking forward to a bright future with your family, all your plans will go swimmingly and you’ll be protected, even if things play out in a way you didn’t expect they would.

5 Ways to Prepare Your Household for Every Situation

No matter what comes up, you can prepare your family for difficult situations if you know what to do. Preparing your family for every occasion, good and bad, can help them mitigate the challenges they’d face if something happened to you or you became unavailable for a while.

By preparing your family for challenging situations, you can help them feel ready for hypothetical situations as well as in their daily lives for years to come. Here’s how.

1. Keep Your Finances in Check

To provide your family with a safety net, you should create a budget plan that will enable you to save more money. If you live below your means, you can put extra money into your savings or a separate account that will keep your family secure in times of need. For your emergency fund, you should budget for three to six months’ worth of expenses. That amount of money should keep your family afloat if a sudden illness or a job loss occurs.

Set financial goals to keep your family on track. You can make a game out of saving together. Putting cash away in envelopes can be fun for children, and as an adult, you can help them learn to count money and rest assured knowing you’re saving money away for a rainy day or a difficult time.

2. Challenge Them Every Day

Teach your family how to do things that take an ounce of bravery every day. For your children, being brave might entail eating a brand-new vegetable. For adults, it may mean making a terrifying purchase or doing something they haven’t done in a long time.

It’s important to introduce your family to new experiences so they never stop growing. Go somewhere you’ve never gone as a family, like a trampoline park or laser tag game. Partaking in different activities can give you a good workout while challenging your brain in different scenarios.

Learning new concepts and partaking in new experiences can teach you about aspects of yourself you didn’t know existed and even change you as a person. They can also help you fight loneliness and improve your cognitive function, which is crucial as you and the rest of your family grow older.

3. Run Through Disaster Scenarios

Even if you’re not in a location that anticipates natural disasters, it always pays to have a plan. How you prepare for a disaster scenario depends on where you live. For example, you’ll be more likely to run through a practice tsunami scenario on the coast rather than in a landlocked state.

You can start to create your unique disaster plan during a family meeting. This way, you can teach children about what they can do during natural disasters and delegate responsibilities to members of the household who can handle them.

Additionally, you should invest in a battery-powered radio that can keep you connected to your community if the power goes out. Listening in on the latest news will give you more updates about your situation during the disaster. It never hurts to have one on hand.

4. Invest in Their Health

Take your children to their checkups. Encourage your partner to make appointments for their health that they may have been neglecting. Regular checkups and visits to health care professionals are linked to the timely detection of chronic illnesses.

Checkups are essential because they can cover what sick visits don’t get the chance to. It’s essential to get a benchmark of your family’s health so that both you and health care professionals can detect when something is wrong.

5. Talk to Them About Difficult Topics

Unfortunately, this world holds many dangers, people, and ideas that can potentially threaten your family. Your children may face inequality or hear about school shootings and become afraid for themselves. It’s your job to educate them with the facts while being receptive to their feelings and finesse the topic in a way that shows you care and only want to teach them the truth to prepare them, not to scare them.

The most crucial part of talking to your children about complex topics is to listen to your kids’ feelings and tell them you’re always open to converse with them further. If you’re not sure about something, you can always promise to educate yourself and teach it to them later.

Try to gauge how much your child already knows about the topic, as well as what is fact and what is fabricated. From there, you can proceed as you see fit with the information you believe is appropriate for your child to know at their age. You want them to be prepared so they know what to do in any situation that they may face.

Keep Your Family Prepared for Any Disaster

As scary as it might be, preparing your family for emergencies, disasters, and uncomfortable situations and topics are vital to allow them to live well. Just in case something happens to you or your partner, you’ve prepared your family for all situations and equipped them with the best knowledge possible.

You never want to think about the worst happening, but you must plan for the worst and hope for the best. Once you have prepared all plans and have guided your family the best way you know how, you can focus on thriving with them for years to come.




Kara Reynolds is the founder and Editor-in-Chief of Momish Magazine. Kara’s mission is to normalize blended families. She enjoys pancakes, pilates, and pinot noir – but not at the same time.